Wednesday, 25 November 2015

My more personal look at Kerry, Ireland (and its pubs!)

The Whiskey Shop at Dublin Airport
Between my author events and launch of my book Crushed in Ireland I was able to see only a little of Killarney, County Kerry. Finding places to eat and warm myself after a blustery, wet and cold day was always a pleasurable activity.

The first thing to catch my eye was this display of boxed whiskey bottles at Dublin Airport before I caught a plane to Kerry Airport.

Killarney, County Kerry, Ireland





 







Killarney was quaint, beautiful and every other shop seemed to be either a pub or a restaurant. A great place to shop and then sample many delicious dishes. It was also the first time that I'd seen the front of a red mustang hanging out of a building.
Killarney all set for Xmas

Have you noticed the Mustang?










I visited quite a few eateries and pubs in Killarney but my local pub was the Village Inn Pub at Kilcummin, Killarney (also known locally as The Club). It didn't have a sign outside but as most of the village seemed to gather there at night then it was aptly named. It was the sort of place I wished I could transport (and all its people) to where I live in England.
The Village Inn Pub, Kilcummin, Killarney


Welcome - The Failte Hotel, Killarney, Kerry

The Failte Hotel at Killarney was particularly good and a chef who could cater to individual requests was a rare find. Its name meant "welcome."
Kirby Brogue Inn, Tralee, Kerry

The Kirby Brogue Inn at Tralee was also good and surprised me by having a coffee house/cafe at one side but a pub at the other.
Limerick


Limerick was busy and vibrant but a stroll around side streets uncovered some hidden gems.

The Tatler Jack pub in Killarney was especially cozy and here is my husband warming his toes.

 
Tatler Jacks Pub, Killarney












 
A traditional Irish Fry breakfast is a treat



 






It was a pity that I didn't have time to sight-see but my book launch meant a busy schedule. Hopefully I will return next year and see more than the inside of pubs or airports.